Moving around #1: Lynton and Lynmouth cliff railway

Exmoor Oct 2014 (295)

In my last visit to North Devon, in September, I had the chance to experience a wonderful  “hide” in one of the most interesting means of the transport in the area, the historical funicular car that connects the villages of Lynton and Lynmouth.

It was an incredible way of being transported back to the history of social and economic development in that area.

Exmoor Oct 2014 (299)
A funicular car, also known as, a cliff railway is a cable vehicle that moves up and down in steep slopes. The cliff railway in between Lynton and Lynmouth is a water powered funicular railway that started to operate in 1890.

Exmoor Oct 2014 (301)
In the 19th century, the high cliffs that separated Lynton from Lynmouth was considered the major obstacle to the economic development of both villages.

Exmoor Oct 2014 (297)
They relied on sea transport because there was no other way of bringing coal, food and other goods from land in Exmoor area that period. The cargo transported by vessels had to be carried by horse up to the hills.

Exmoor Oct 2014 (300)

“Lynmouth would become more important as a port for the surroundings districts, as good could then be more easily carted inland; and visitors would find it a great benefit, for instead of climbing the hill, they could be drawn up in a comfortable carriage.”

The railway is now classified as a listed monument.

Sources| Cliff Railway Lynton  Photos| Rob Dann

Advertisements

Posted by

I'm a Brazilian journalist based in West Midlands. In Brazil, I have worked with International Trade and Logistics publications. Now in the UK, I keep writing and I dedicate myself to a new project : Midlands Trade - a blog focused on business in Europe and Brazil. It's also supporting small businesses throughout the #MeetTheBusiness.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s